Introduction to clinical trials: lay-friendly video

Format: Videos
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Language/s: English
,
čeština
,
dansk
,
Deutsche
,
eesti
,
español
,
français
,
Gaeilge
,
italiano
,
latviešu
,
lietuvių
,
magyar
,
Malti
,
Nederlands
,
polski
,
português
,
română
,
slovenčina
,
slovenščina
,
suomi
,
svenska
,
Greek
,
Bulgarian
,
Short Description:

This lay-friendly video introduction to clinical trials was created by the European Communication on Research Awareness Needs Project.

Key Concepts addressed:

Details

This 5-minute lay-friendly video was created by the European Communication on Research Awareness Needs (ECRAN) Project.  The animation is available in 23 languages and is aimed at a lay audience, or those with little knowledge about clinical trials. The ECRAN group have also produced a great powerpoint presentation explaining clinical trial for patients(15-minutes).

Enjoy the film and discover how Clinical Trials work today.

Clinical Research from ECRAN project on Vimeo.

About the video

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Trial participants should be similar to those in which the treatment will be used in real life.

The ECRAN video explains the following key aspects of clinical trials:

  • The clinical trial protocol must be approved by an ethics committee, with independent experts and patients’ representatives
  • Participants should be divided into similar groups which receive the treatments and control or placebo respectively
  • Random allocation of participants to these groups
  • Participants, carers and researchers should be blinded to treatment allocation
  • Results should be replicated in other independent trials
  • The benefits and risks of new treatments should be evaluated together
Outcomes that matter

Trials should look at outcomes that matter to patients

Common pitfalls:

  • Placebos should not be used where there are effective treatments available
  • Trials should include patients like those in whom the treatment would be used in real life
  • Treatments should improve outcomes that are important to patients
  • New treatments should be better than the current treatment, not just a placebo

Languages

The video is available in the following languages:

bg – български
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
en – English
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
lv – latviešu
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
ro – română
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
cs – čeština
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
es – español
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
hu – magyar
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
sk – slovenčina
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
da – dansk
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
fr – français
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
mt – Malti
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
sl – slovenščina
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
de – Deutsch
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
ga – Gaeilge
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
nl – Nederlands
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
fi – suomi
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
et – eesti
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
it – italiano
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
pl – polski
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
sv – svenska
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
el – ελληνικά
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
lt – lietuvių
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4
pt – português
Fullscreen: Vimeo
Download: mp4

Synopsis

Back in 1747, James Lind had never heard about clinical trials!

Lind was a Scottish naval surgeon, and he found himself on a Royal Navy ship full of sailors sick with scurvy. His ideas revolutionised our understanding of how to test which treatment might work best. His work not only saved lives on his ship, but laid the foundation for modern clinical trials (randomised controlled trials) as we know them today.

Every year since 2005, The European Clinical Research Infrastructures Network (ECRIN) has celebrated The International Clinical Trials’ Day (ICTD) at or around the 20th of May (www.ecrin.org) in order to commemorate the day James Lind started his famous trial (www.jameslindlibrary.org). ECRAN and ECRIN urge others to take up the habit of celebrating the ICTD.

  • William Tarnow-Mordi

    Fabulous – literally! We would like to include this in a randomised study of how to equip parents, doctors, nurses and other clinicians as effective research partners in clinical trials of treatments in babies and children.

    • Douglas_Badenoch

      Thanks William. I am sure the ECRAN team will be very interested to hear what they think of it.

      How do you think you’ll use it? As part of an intervention? (Please don’t say it’s going to be the placebo!)

      😉

  • Dr. Amy Price

    I like it too! We watched it as part of the learning process in the MOOC Theme group at EBHC2013. Good viewer response. We need these simple accurate messages to advance science and ethics in the public domain…thank you