Questions about translating research evidence into practice

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  • Ichalmers

    I suggest starting from scratch with this section. I gave up cutting and pasting the erros about a third of the way through.

    Use bolded italics for questions

    Replace ‘using a bar chart.3’ by ‘using a bar chart.[3]’

    Replace ‘If all 100 had taken blood pressure drug B, then ten would get heart disease or have a stroke and three would avoid getting’

    What will happen to 100 people like you in the next 10 years?

    heart disease or having a stroke.

    by ‘If all 100 had taken blood pressure drug B, then ten would get heart disease or have a stroke and three would avoid getting heart disease or having a stroke.’

    And use ‘What will happen to 100 people like you in the next 10 years?’ as legend for the Figure.

    Reproduce Table on page 150

    Remove (it’s a vignette)
    DON’T BE FOOLED BY EYE-CATCHING STATISTICS

    ‘Let’s say the risk of having a heart attack in your fifties is 50 per cent higher if you have a high cholesterol. That sounds pretty bad. Let’s say the extra risk of having a heart attack if you have a high cholesterol is only 2 per cent. That sounds OK to me. But they’re the same (hypothetical figures). Let’s try this. Out of a hundred men in their fifties with normal cholesterol, four will be expected to have a heart attack; whereas out of a hundred men with high cholesterol, six will be expected to have a heart attack. That’s two extra heart attacks per hundred.’
    Goldacre B. Bad Science. London: Fourth Estate 2008, pp239-40.